In Other News

With July 4th coming, here’s how to enjoy fireworks safely and legally

From staff reports|

California the over-regulator? Not for addiction treatment

When it comes to drug and alcohol rehab centers, California channels its inner Texas: few burdens on business and as free-market as possible. That stands in sharp contrast to New York, Massachusetts and a dozen other states, where would-be rehab...

By Teri Sforza tsforza@scng.com @terisforza on Twitter|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Medical marijuana

    Medical marijuana shops could start opening in Long Beach as soon as July

    About a dozen medical marijuana dispensaries could begin opening their doors as early as July under a new law enacted by Long Beach voters in the fall. Those on the cusp of receiving final approval from the city include a list of priority applicants, comprised of former medical marijuana business owners who received city permits in a 2010 lottery, only to have them later revoked when the city reversed legalization and banned all such businesses. Last year, members of that same...

    Courtney Tompkins
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  • Local governments

    Long Beach may crack down on illegal marijuana businesses with new penalties

    Long Beach may make it easier to crack down on illegal marijuana businesses by adding a few tools to its legal arsenal. The City Council on Tuesday will consider amending a local law, based on recommendations by the city attorney’s office, that would further enable officials to penalize illegal marijuana establishments and property owners, in an effort to gain compliance and to deter such operations in the first place. When Price suggested additional enforcement tools...

    Courtney Tompkins
    |

  • Health

    Coping with opioid crisis varies wildly form state to state

    Location, location, location. That mantra may apply even when it comes to how opioid addiction is treated. Specifically, patients with private insurance who are diagnosed with opioid dependency or abuse may get different medical services depending on where they live, a white paper to be released in the upcoming week by a national databank indicates. Medical responses to opioid-related diagnoses appear to differ among the five states examined by Fair Health, a nonprofit that...

    By Julie Appleby California Healthline|

  • Assisted suicide

    Suit over life-ending drugs for terminally ill gets hearing in Riverside

    RIVERSIDE >> A judge on Friday is expected to weigh whether a challenge can proceed to California’s law letting terminally ill patients seek prescriptions for life-ending drugs. Riverside County Judge Daniel A. Ottolia is expected to hear arguments over whether a lawsuit by doctors challenging the state’s 2016 law permitting medically-assisted death can move forward. California’s Attorney General Xavier Becerra has argued that the suit should be...

    The Associated Press|

  • Public health

    LA County’s first human case of West Nile virus reported in San Gabriel Valley

    An elderly resident living in the San Gabriel Valley was hospitalized in late March after contracting West Nile virus, health officials said Thursday. It was the first case of a human West Nile infection reported in Los Angeles County this year, according to a Los Angeles County Department of Public Health statement. The patient has since recovered from the virus, which is spread through the bite of mosquitoes. Officials reminded residents to take precautions against mosquito...

    Stephanie K. Baer
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  • Public health

    As opioid abuse grips nation, LA County sheriff deploys Narcan to reverse overdoses

    Hoping to stem a national wave of opioid- and heroin-related deaths, the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department announced Thursday that deputies from across the region will be equipped with a potentially life-saving nasal spray. Deputies from the Santa Clarita, La Crescenta and East Los Angeles sheriffs stations along with the parks and community college bureaus will be equipped with 1,200 doses of a nasal spray known on the market as Narcan. The spray reverses the effects of...

    Susan Abram
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  • Environmental health

    ‘We can smell it’: Frustrated Paramount parents still worry about odors, toxic emissions

    PARAMOUNT >> Keep at it. That’s the message Paramount residents have for air officials who have intermittently shut down two metal forging facilities for releasing a cancer-causing substance. And this week the South Coast Air Quality Management District announced it will be going after another metal-related business that received 190 odor complaints since December. That company,

    Rachel Uranga
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  • Poverty

    California’s kids are healthier but many are living in poverty

    Ambar Garcia, who lives just north of downtown Los Angeles, said she’s thankful her two daughters have health coverage through California’s version of Medicaid, the government program for low-income people. That’s one less bill to worry about. But Garcia, a 30-year-old receptionist at a dental office, said she still has trouble paying the rest. Nearly all of her monthly income goes to her rent, so she relies on her mom to help with child care, and the federal...

    By Anna Gorman California Healthline|

  • Emergency care

    Medi-Cal patients flocking to ERs more than before Obamacare

    Medi-Cal patients are swamping California emergency rooms in greater numbers than they did before the Affordable Care Act took effect, despite predictions that the health law would ease the burden on ERs. Emergency room visits by people on Medi-Cal rose 75 percent over five years, from 800,000 in the first quarter of 2012 to 1.4 million in the last quarter of 2016, according to data recently released by the state’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. The...

    By Kellen Browning California Healthline|

  • Suicide prevention

    California law spurs reforms after heartbreaking student suicide cluster

    About 24 hours after a Clovis High School boy killed himself in early March, his cell phone buzzed. The incoming text was the latest in a conversation thread among the deceased boy and three teenage girls before he died. One of the girls, also from the Central Valley, was thinking of killing herself. At the Fresno County coroner’s office, a deputy coroner discovered the text and launched a search for the girl that would reach into the records of the Clovis Unified School...

    By Jane Meredith Adams EdSource|

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